In the waiting room

Throwing caution to the wind I dropped my Nikon D600 into Harvey Norman Penrith for the last time. Surprisingly the issue was dealt with promptly and with a minimum of fuss. I took some paperwork (Previous job cards from Nikon Sydney, the most recent reference file and a copy of a 40 + page Class Action Lawsuit) with me this time which I think gave the guys who I spoke to (Peter and Joe) a better view of the bigger picture. I put my preferred options on the table and now simply have to wait for the outcome. Hopefully I won’t have to follow through with the next step.

Nikon-d600

image courtesy of www.nphotomag.com

Nikon D600 Dust and Oil Damnation

200 + marks on sensor (visible dust and oil) after last round of shooting. This was amongst the last of the shots taken recently with my Nikon D600 which has had 3 shutter replacements in 14 months.

The conversion to black and white in the image below highlights the severity of the problem.

dust and oil

1st shutter replacement down, 2nd shutter replacement down, 3rd shutter replacement down. Bitterly disappointed to say the least. I really have nothing left to say on this matter.

Good luck to anyone out there still experiencing problems with the D600. I hope that your cases are heard sympathetically and that you get a just resolution.

 

Oil and Dust return to haunt Nikon D600

After 3 services (sensor clean) and 3 shutter replacements I had every good reason to believe the problem had gone. Not so……

The shots referenced here were taken in the last few days. I only got to see them last night after returning from 3 days away. It’s disheartening to say the least. In all instances UV filter and lens had been cleaned prior to shooting.

The shots below were references for me to see how the UV filter was affecting the colour balance. I’ve multiplied the layers in Photoshop to increase the visibility of the finer oil marks on the sensor.

Filter On

Filter on

Filter Off

Filter_off2

Subsequent shot samples showing further accumulation of marks.

oil3

The shot below has been processed to increase the visibility of some marks.

oil4

 

This one (below) from today (18th April) after cleaning lens, filter and running an in camera sensor clean.

Clearly this is a dust and  oil issue.

oil6

Can’t get to Nikon until next week (after Easter). I’ll see how good the promise by Nikon is to replace faulty D600 cameras.

I guess that in the entire time I’ve had the D600 (just over a year) I’ve only had a few months of trouble free shooting. I can see why China banned the sale of this camera. Luckily I had my Canon G1X on hand, so whilst the shots on the Nikon D600 are useless I was able to salvage something from the time away.

As for the retailer I purchased the camera from (Harvey Norman @ Penrith), I can’t even see the point in trying to get any result from them: the 3 year replacement warranty to date hasn’t been worth the paper its written on.

D600 officially retired today.

 

Nikon issue official D600 statement

After China banned the sale of Nikon D600’s Nikon released the following statement on the 28th of March 2014

“With regard to the issue with which multiple granular dust spots are reflected in images captured with the D600 digital SLR camera, Nikon sincerely apologizes for any concern and inconvenience suffered by D600 users, retailers, and all concerned.

Because Nikon takes this matter very seriously, we will continue to offer users of the D600 a special service with which cameras are inspected, cleaned, and if necessary, shutter and related parts are replaced free of charge, even after the product warranty has expired. However, if a number of multiple granular dust spots are still noticeable in images captured with a D600 upon which the above service has been performed several times, Nikon will replace it with a new D600 or an equivalent model.”

Read the full stories here and here